Roger STEVENS

Male


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  • Name  Roger STEVENS 
    Gender  Male 
    Notes 
    • MYSTERIES OF THE RIDEAU
      Col. Stephen Burrit and (156) Roger Stevens Jr. had worked together out of St. John's as secret agents for the British during the American Revolution (see below). In 1793, Col. Burritt, his three brothers and their wives floated down the Rideau River on a raft, looking for a spot for a settlement. When they got to a certain rapids, they saw the potential for a mill. The community that grew there later became known as "Burrit's Rapids". The story goes that, soon after settling there, the Burritts were dying from fever when they were rescued by a band of local Indians, nursed back to health, and even had their crops harvested for them. Ever after, the Burritt home was a welcoming place for Indians.(REF: http://www.rideau-info.com/friends/rideaucorridor.html)
      There is a tradition of there being Native Americans in my family tree; a good candidate would be (78) Guy Stevens' little-known wife (78) Margaret.
      "The Petition of Martha Burritt Daughter of Roger Stevens U.E. -
      "Humbly Sheweth, That your Petitioner is desirous of Availing herself of an Order of the Govenor in Council bearing date the 9th of November 1789 wherein the Sons and Daughters of Such Loyalists as Joined the Royal Standard before the Treaty of Separation in the year 1783 are entitled to 200 acres of Land - - - That your Petitioner considers herself coming under this description . . . . Granted her Matilda Martha Burritt 27 March 1793 PAC RGI L3 67 Certificate Granted 27th March 1793 200 acres."
      -- http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~russellgs/notes/not0044.html#NI11630
      "A regional road commemorates his name. In 1790, (156) Roger [III] was the first settler in what was to become Carlton Co."
      "In the public Archives in Toronto there is considerable information on [Roger III]. There are several Petitions that reveal the amazing vision of this individual who had already suffered much - ostracism, jail, threat of flogging and execution, and the loss of the mother of his two young daughters, all because of outspoken support for government under the British Monarchy rather than that of the American Revolutionary Forces. In 1784 he was granted land along the St. Lawrence, but he left the security of the "front" when he learned, perhaps from the Indians, of the "Great Falls" on the north side of the Rideau where he envisioned a settlement where his mills would support a growing population in a then unknown Wilderness..."
      "Early in the American conflict, Roger Jr., declared his allegiance to Britain and was imprisoned in Litchfield, Conn. He escaped, General Burgoyne, and then became part of the Secret Service, [spying for the British in rebel territory, disguised in civilian clothing. Roger's property was sold to defray the expenses of the American army. According to his grand-nephew, Dr. Stephen Stevens, `He was given a terrible death sentence, also with forty lashes on his bare body with Beech branches, should he be captured, and possibly death.'] He had married Martha Doolittle and had 2 daughters before the mothers untimely death 3 Dec 1782 at Dorchester, St. Johns, Lower Canada. (District of Montreal). While in the Secret Service he worked with Stephen Burritt who became his son-in-law. Stephen & Martha Burritt with an infant son settled on his wife's new grant on the north side of the Rideau in Marlborough Twp within a mile of her father.
      "In December [1793], (156[1]a) Martha had another son, Edmund, the first white child born in Carleton County. *"Our STEVENS Story on the Move" by Elizabeth Stevens Stuart."
      -- http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~russellgs/notes/not0043.html#NI11604
      In the Autumn of 1793, Roger mysteriously drowned; later that same year, his new wife (157) Polly reported that "her home and moveables had burned" (including title deeds, etc.). In 1784 he had been granted land along the St. Lawrence, but he left the security of the "front" when he learned, perhaps from the Indians, of the "Great Falls" on the north side of the Rideau where he envisioned a settlement where he planned to construct mills to support a growing population.
      William Merrick was with Roger when he drowned in what was to become known as Stevens Creek. Two years later, in 1795, Merrick applied for Roger's property, stating that he had bought it from him. William built new mills there, which formed the nucleus of a community that would later be called "Merrickville". The Merrick family remained the driving force in local business and politics for years to come.
    Person ID  I2355  Jacobson/Dickson
    Last Modified  11 Apr 2008 

    Father  Roger STEVENS,   b. 25 May 1730, Quaker Hill, Dutchess, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1808, Delta, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Mary DOOLITTLE,   b. 16 Feb 1728, Stafford, Tolland, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Dec 1803, Leed, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1745  Palmer, Hampden, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Notes 
    • Per website, www.pcez.com/ ninth gegeration bigshoe du Stev mohawk

      they were married in Quaker hill, NY Needs verification

      Following note made by Kerri Harris on 7/2/2006
      Per website http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=saby&id=I1681 they were married 1755 in Palmer, Hampton, Massachusetts
      Sources:
      Abbrev: or 1745, Quaker Hill, Dutchess Co., New York Note: or 1745, Quaker Hill, Dutchess Co., New York
    Family ID  F814  Group Sheet

    Family  Martha DOOLITTLE 
    Married  1772 
    Family ID  F1029  Group Sheet

  • Sources 
    1. [S21] Descendants of Roger Stevens, B 1700, Jill Fyffe (not all info always correct-please verify with other source), (Outline report rfyffe@peterboro.net), pg 1, paragraph 1.