Notes


Matches 251 to 281 of 281

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251 This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File:
Hyram /PHILLIPS/ (AFN:4GK8-F6) and Mariah L /DURRANT/ (AFN:18FB-SF) 
PHILLIPS, Leah Eliza (I366)
 
252 This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File:
Isaac /LOLLAR/ (AFN:1QRJ-VL) and Elizabeth // (AFN:1QRJ-WR) 
LOLLAR, ELIZABETH (I296)
 
253 This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File:
Pattilo /LITTLETON/ (AFN:9789-4J) and Elizabeth /PERKINS/ (AFN:1WVM-X1) 
PATILLO, ELIZABETH (I288)
 
254 This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File:
Richard /PERKINS/ (AFN:1C4P-VK) and Mary /SHERWILL/ (AFN:1C4P-WQ) 
PERKINS, RICHARD (I315)
 
255 This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File:
William R /TAYLOR/ (AFN:18RV-V1) and Margaret J /ELLISON/ (AFN:2CNN-SR) 
TAYLOR, JOHN HENRY (I122)
 
256 This person was not married to our Henry Stevens-There is no mention of her in Augusta's autobiography. This wedding supposedly took place in Ontario Canada while our Henry was in Ephraim Utah with 2 wives already. HANSEN, MARGARET Annie (I106)
 
257 This website has lots of good information.
http://www.wyominggenealogy.com/uinta/vicinity_of_evanston.htm 
MYERS, JOHN (I176)
 
258 Time Line 1826 Earliest Settler of Fountain Green, Hancock Co., IL - History of Fountain Green Township. 1830 Elections held at house of Ute Perkins - History of Hancock Co. (233) PERKINS, Ute (I270)
 
259 Tomstown or Mount Alto was birthplace in Franklin, PA ROCK, JACOB (I575)
 
260 Two different sources say different things about his death and govenorship.
History of Conneticut from the first settlement of the colony to the .... by Gideon Hyrum Hollister. p 509 says Stephen Goodyear an early magistrate of New Haven Colony and one of its wealthiest and most enterprising citizens became a resident there in 1637. He was chosen deputy govenor in 1641 and continued to hold the office until 1650. In 1653 he united with others in the purchase of a large tract of land on the Housatonic River at a place called Paugasset ( Now Derby ). His wife embarked for Englan on board Mr Lamberton's ship in Jan 1647 and was never heard of afterwards.
Govenor Goodyear died in London in 1657. 
GOODYEAR, Stephen (I2315)
 
261 Updated information from Paul W. Jacobson 4/2010: Daniel John Jacobson was killed in a logging accident on Taylor Mountain, near Vernal, Uintah, Utah, not in Ephraim. JACOBSON, Daniel John (I67)
 
262 Vera was a beautiful young lady. She died of heart failure when she was only 15 years old. JACOBSON, Vera Antoinette (I2734)
 
263 Waldo Perkins has done extensive research on this family. I need to find the source info on his book. PERKINS, SARAH Caroline (I223)
 
264 Was also known as Jacob Andreasen. This name is listed on the birth records of some, but not all of his children. JACOBSEN, Jacob (I62)
 
265 Was born prematurely after Leola had been sick several months. She lived only a few hours. JACOBSON, MARIE (I42)
 
266 Was first born of twins. Other twin survived, and was a girl. STODDARD, Aaron (I2104)
 
267 Was in Bastard Township, Leeds, Ontario, Canada in 1817 census of Ontario. MITCHELL, MARY (I214)
 
268 Was member of Relief Society in Nauvoo STODDARD, MARY ANN (I154)
 
269 Was member of the Nauvoo Relief Society

Marriage was witnessed by Billa 
DICKSON, MARY (I169)
 
270 Was not Colorado at the time. It was the Utah Territory.

He died of tuberculosis while in the Mormon Battalion. 
PERKINS, JOHN Calvin (I240)
 
271 Why Henry moved to Canada with his brothers Roger and Abel Stevens and more:

VERMONT DURING THE REVOLUTION
Vermont had been claimed by both New York and New Hampshire, and was the scene of a bitter dispute in the early 1770's. At that time, Ethan Allen and "the Green Mountain Boys" actively fought the New Yorkers, who were oppressing Vermonters who had received land grants from New Hampshire At one point, the Governor of New York laid a bounty of £100 on Allen's head. The two parties briefly put aside their differences with the outbreak of the American Revolution, though, and Allen and his men rendered useful service to the Patriot cause -- including an abortive attack on Quebec, in which (625a) Benjamin and (313ii) Ephraim Stevens were captured.
In 1777, Vermont declared itself an independent republic. When the Continental Congress refused to recognize her independence, Allen negotiated with British Maj. James Rogers about the possiblity of making Vermont a Canadian province. For this, he was accused of treason, though the charge was later dropped. After the Treaty of Paris, hostilities continued in Vermont, up until her admission as a state in 1791. According to Dr. Stephen Stevens, grandson of (313i) Abel Stevens, "The New Yorkers and the French and Indians destroyed everything possible, burned homes, took people captive, murdered many, until it became a fearful place to live in...." According to Stevens, this was the reason so many of his family moved to Canada, where (156) Roger Stevens Jr. had received land. 
STEVENS, HENRY (I104)
 
272 WID OF JOHN SPERRY POST, ELIZABETH (I684)
 
273 Will of Elizabeth Hutchins (Curtis-married last name)
Fairfield County, Connecticut Probate Records, Volume 1 (1648-1656), page 17
The last will and testament of Elizabeth Curtiss, In the Name of God, Amen, I Elizabeth Curtis to make publick my last will and testament...being weak yet of perfect in my minde... Inprimis unto my sonns John Curtiss and William doe give my Mare and Coalt. Item, unto John Curtiss and Jonathan Curtiss ye sonnes of my sonnes John and William, my grandchildren I doe give the coalt that my young mare hath: and after the sayd young mare hath up her first coalt, Then I doe give ye sayd young mare to the rest of my grandchildren, sonns and daughters of my aforesaid sonns John and William: Item, I doe give one house and lott to my grandchildren, John Curtiss, Israel, Jonathan, and Sarah Curtiss ye children of ye said John and William: and they to enjoy it when they become to ye age of twenty: Item, I doe give unto my grandchilde Mary Curtiss ye daughter of Thomas Curtiss forty shillings and to bee paid unto her by my sonns John and William within a yeare after my decease: Item, I doe give my grandchilde Mary Curtiss ye daughter of Thomas Curtis, deceased forty shillings and to bee paid unto her by my sonns John and William Curtiss within a yeare after my decease: Item, I doe give unto my sonns John and William Curtiss my two cowss, one hiefer, one bullock and a calf after my deceas: provided ye if my sayd young mare before given to my grandchildren should miscarry. Then my will is if my two sonns John and William Curtiss should give foure pounds each of them to three children ye have no share in my house and lott to be paid att ye age of twentie: Item, I doe give my bible to John Curtiss my grandchilde the sonn of John Curtiss allso my desire is ye there be so much of my corn sould as may buy a bible for Jonathan Curtiss ye sonn of my sonn William and given to him: The rest of my goods within ye house that are moveable goods I doe give to my sonns John and William Curtiss to be equally divided betwixt them: My two sonns John Curtiss and William Curtiss I doe make executors and my will is ye John Birdseye, Henry Wakelyn and Joseph Hawly shall bee overseers of this my last will and testament. In ye presence of John Brimsmaid Elizabeth Curtiss Seal John Washborn This will was proved by John Curtiss and William Curtiss to bee ye last will and testant of Elizabeth Curtiss of Stratford: and ye court approvs of it; it being attested to: 4th: 4th: '58 John Minor 
HUTCHINS, Elizabeth (I1669)
 
274 Will: 17 Jan 1610, Suffolk, England

THE EMERGENCE OF DOWNING STREET IN LONDON
LINK: https://www.gov.uk/government/history/10-downing-street

George Downing gave his name to the most famous street in the world. It is unfortunate that he was such an unpleasant man. Able as a diplomat and a government administrator, he was miserly and at times brutal.

However, George Downing was responsible for the street, its name and the building we know today. A former diplomat at The Hague serving the Commonwealth, he changed allegiance with finesse. He traded enough secrets to gain a royal pardon in March 1660 and, by the Restoration in May 1660, to be rewarded with a knighthood.

Interested in power and money, he saw an opportunity to make his fortune in property. He had already gained the Crown interest in the land around Hampden House, but could not take possession as it was under lease to Knyvet's descendants. In 1682 he secured the leases to the property and employed Sir Christopher Wren to design the houses.

Between 1682 and 1684, existing properties were pulled down and in their place a cul-de-sac of 15 to 20 terraced houses was built along the north side of the new street, Downing Street. In order to maximise profit, the houses were cheaply built, with poor foundations for the boggy ground. Instead of neat brick fašades, they had mortar lines drawn on to give the appearance of evenly spaced bricks. In the 20th Century, Prime Minister Winston Churchill wrote that Number 10 was:

Shaky and lightly built by the profiteering contractor whose name they bear.

A rather important neighbour complained, however. The new houses were built directly behind a large and impressive house overlooking Horse Guards. Its occupier, the Countess of Lichfield, daughter of Charles II, was less than pleased with the emergence of the unwelcome terrace behind. She complained to her father, who wrote back with advice:

I think that it is a very reasonable thing that other houses should not look into your house without your permission, and this note will be sufficient for Mr Surveyor to build up your wall as high as you please.

The original numbering of the Downing Street houses was completely different from what we see today. The sequence of numbers was haphazard, and the houses tended to be known by the name or title of their occupants. The current Number 10 started out life as Number 5, and was not renumbered until 1779.

The Downing Street house had several distinguished residents. The Countess of Yarmouth lived at Number 10 between 1688 and 1689, and was followed by Lord Lansdowne from 1692 to 1696 and the Earl of Grantham from 1699 to 1703. The last private resident of Downing's terrace was one Mr Chicken. Little is known about him except that he moved out in the early 1730s. 
DOWNING, George (I2275)
 
275 William Hodge fought in the Revolutionary War. He was a volunteer soldier in the militia. He went out to protect the Byram River Bridge against the British in Fairfield County Connecticut. He served one day and was killed. He was the father of Philo Hodge who also served in the revolutionary war. He was killed 6 Mar 1780.
 
HODGE, WILLIAM (I440)
 
276 Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, 1st Congregational Church Records Volume 1 (1670-1829), page 19 1692 Jan: 10 Israel Curtiss ye son of Israel Curtiss admitted to full communion CURTISS, Israel (62) (I1656)
 
277 Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, 1st Congregational Church Records Volume 1 (1670-1829), page 26 1697 May 26 Thomas Minor was admitted to full communion MINOR, Thomas (I1992)
 
278 Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, 1st Congregational Church Records Volume 1 (1670-1829), page 32. 1707 June 29 Stephen Curtiss and Sarah his wife were admitted to full communion CURTISS, Stephen (64) (I1657)
 
279 Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, 1st Congregational Church Records Volume 1 (1670-1829), page 33. 1708 Jany 18 Ruth ye daughter of Stephen Curtiss was baptized CURTISS, Ruth (190) (I1979)
 
280 Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, 1st Congregational Church Records Volume 1 (1670-1829), page 35. 1710 Feb 26 Stephen ye son of Stephen Curtiss was baptized CURTISS, Stephen (191) (I1983)
 
281 Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, 1st Congregational Church Records Volume 1 (1670-1829), page 39 1714 Mar 7th Hannah Minor was admitted to full communion CURTISS, Hannah (65) (I1662)
 

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